ARETÉ LEARNING TRUST
×
PROSPECTUSES
×

» News » PREVIEW OF TUTANKHAMUN’S TRUMPET  EVENT AT THE RICHMOND WALKING AND BOOK FESTIVAL

PREVIEW OF TUTANKHAMUN’S TRUMPET  EVENT AT THE RICHMOND WALKING AND BOOK FESTIVAL

07 September 2022  |  Jill Lundberg  |  Posted in: ,

We are delighted to be supporting Richmond’s Walking & Book Festival. Not only have our students designed s the posters to promote the Festival,, but they have also been busy researching some of the events. We are pleased to bring you the first preview by Maddie James, in Year 10, who has written a preview of Tutankahmun’s Trumpet which we hope you will enjoy reading below.

If you are interested in this event then you can see it at The Station on Tuesday 20th September at 7:30pm. Tickets are £12 and can be ordered HERE.

Concessionary Tickets: people in full time education, people receiving income assessment benefits, or carers supporting other attendees may purchase tickets for most events at half-price.

Tutankhamun’s Trumpet

Tutankhamun, a figure shrouded in mystery and intrigue, observed through an obscured lens, someone’s whose judgements of, we solely rely on the media for, has always been regarded as a solemn guardian of the pharaoh’s. Few would deny the timeless allure of Egypt’s vivid and fascinating enigma of the Curse of Tutankhamun. However, this accursed pharaoh has been painted through a new, refined brush, one that offers a refreshing, unique perspective by acclaimed Egyptologist Toby Wilkinson through Tutunkhamun’s world-renowned riches as eye-witnesses to the events that unfolded on 26th November, 1922.

On 20th September, at The Station, Toby Wilkinson will present a captivating investigation of the groundbreaking discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb, crafting an image of ancient Egypt through the boy-king’s riches that were taken with him to the grave. Wilkinson gained critical acclaim through his books on Egyptian history including ‘The Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt’ which earned him the Hessell-Tiltman Prize in 2011 for the best work of non-fiction historical content.

Wilkinson’s ingenious exploration of one hundred artefacts uncovered within Tutankhamun’s tomb will weave a portrait of geography, culture, history and legacy exclusive to ancient Egypt. James McConnachie concludes in his review in the Sunday Times, ‘To the ancient Egyptians, a pharaoh’s tomb was a “resurrection machine” and, in a sense, they were right. The dead cannot be resurrected but, through the artefacts they used, we can sense the lives they lived. I’ve read many books on ancient Egypt, but I’ve never felt closer to its people.’ The evening promises to engage and enthral enthusiasts and sceptics alike through ‘The work of a man who is practised at explaining the past to the present.’

 

Scroll to Top