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» News » Magnificent Seven complete the Great North Run

Magnificent Seven complete the Great North Run

18 September 2019  |  Jill Lundberg  |  Posted in:

Five members of staff and two students successfully completed the Great North Run and, in doing so, achieved personal bests and donated over £2,800 to Bowel Cancer UK, Cancer Research and The Sick Children’s Trust.  Not forgetting the essential behind-the-scenes support staff, Clare Clish completed her third year as a volunteer. Five members of staff and two students successfully completed the Great North Run and, in doing so, achieved personal bests and donated over £2,800 to Bowel Cancer UK, Cancer Research and The Sick Children’s Trust.  Not forgetting the essential behind-the-scenes support staff, Clare Clish completed her third year as a volunteer. A year ago, Charlotte Rogerson, Sam Weston and Victoria Roberts were non-runners but after joining the Swaledale Shufflers and the Couch to 5k running programme (C25k) they decided to go a few steps further (in fact 16km further!) and take up the challenge of the Great North Run. Sam said: “I’ve always wanted to complete the Great North Run, but never believed I was capable. The Swaledale Shufflers gave me the confidence to believe I could run, as well as a group of amazing, inspiring friends to run with regularly. We’ve all been on our own running journeys this year, but we’ve done it all together and supported each other along the way.” Sam was fundraising for The Sick Children’s Trust who provide accommodation for families while their children are in hospital.  Sam’s family stayed at Crawford House for four months when her son, Marcus, was in hospital as a baby. Sam had breakfast at Crawford house on the morning of the race and it reminded her how much the charity means to her and other families. She raised enough money to accommodate a family in Crawford House for 20 days. Victoria, who was running to support Bowel Cancer UK and achieved a time of 2.49, said: “Despite a variety of injuries along the way, we kept each other going and most importantly, kept on laughing and having fun together. She added: “We are definitely now true athletes and will be giving Mo Farah a run for his money next time I’m sure!”  Having lost her father and her mother-in-law and father-in-law to cancer, Charlotte Rogerson ran for Cancer Research.  She has a number of friends who are battling cancer and so it’s a charity that is very close to her heart. Charlotte said: “It was an amazing experience and I’m so proud of myself and the girls going from C25K to a half marathon in a year – something I never thought possible! The whole journey has made me 100% committed to keep running”   Sarah Pike had never done the Great North Run and set herself the goal as a way to get back into running. She had such a great time that she would love to do it again, especially with it being the 40th GNR next year, Her time was 2:19. She was hoping to come in at around 2:30 so was really pleased with her achievement.   Alex Withington-Wray also completed the race in a fabulous time of 2.01 and was running for Cancer Research UK.   Two students also did magnificently. Andie Jones, in Year 13, was inspired to do the Great North Run by her Dad, Pau,l who has taken part many times and Andie really admires him for that.  Andie said: “My Dad has always been my role model when it comes to sport so taking part in the GNR was something I’ve always wanted to do. It was one of the hardest things I’ve ever done but has also been one of the most rewarding. I chose to run for ‘St. Oswald’s Hospice’ as they are an amazing charity and do amazing work, so far I have raised £100.00 and I am continuing to raise money after the event. My time was 02:03:48, which I was very pleased with. I will be entering for the GNR again for 2020 and will also be entering the London Marathon for 2021.” Ollie Rogerson, Charlotte’s son, ran his first-ever Junior GNR. The twelve-year-old was awesome, completing 4K in 16.47 and coming in 27th out of 443. Ollie has always enjoyed running and has been running with Richmond & Zetland Harriers for just over a year. He keeps going from strength to strength. Having competed in the GNR a few times, and really loved it, Clare Clish has been a volunteer at the event for the last three years. The is an essential member of the support crew, working on the medal station in the finish funnel, putting medals around the necks of the runners.  Clare helps to manage a team of 70 volunteers who give out medals and make sure the runners keep moving.  They also make sure they identify any medical problems, getting help if required.  It’s a really tiring day, starting at 8am sorting out the medals before going to the finish line to watch the elite runners finish. A quick run back to the medal station to await the masses pouring in!  Clare said: It gets really busy, obviously, as 57,000 runners pass through 11 medal stations over the course of about four hours but it’s lovely because you get lots of sweaty hugs from very tired and happy runners. Clare is pictured centre in the group of volunteers.

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